Monday, January 15, 2018

Comics: Marcia Snyder, Artist


Marcia Louise Snyder was born on May 13, 1907, in Kalamazoo, Michigan. The birth date is from the Social Security Death Index and the birthplace is based on her parents’ residence in Kalamazoo. Snyder’s full name appeared in the Kalamazoo Gazette (Michigan), June 13, 1921, and Florida death certificate. Snyder’s parents were Charles R. Snyder and Louise P. Underwood, who married on January 20, 1898 in Kalamazoo, according to the Michigan Marriage Records at Ancestry,com.

In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Snyder’s parents resided with her maternal grandparents, Theodore and Katherine Underwood, in Chicago, Illinois, at 6707 Wentworth Avenue. Snyder’s father was a clerk at a shoe store. Shortly after the census enumeration, Snyder’s parents moved to Kalamazoo. The first child of Snyder’s parents died shortly after birth in 1902. The couple lost their second child in 1906.

The 1907 and 1909 Kalamazoo city directories listed Snyder’s father as a clerk who lived at 219 West Cedar Street.

The 1910 census recorded Snyder, her parents and three-month-old brother David, and an aunt, Pauline, in Kalamazoo at 1007 South West Street. Snyder’s father was a shoe store salesman. In the 1917 city directory, Snyder’s father worked in the insurance industry.

The Gazette, May 11, 1919, reported the upcoming performance of the cantata, “Childhood of Hiawatha”. Snyder was one of the 150 children in the chorus that sang with the Chicago Symphony orchestra. Music News, May 30, 1919, published an article about the May Festival; Snyder was mentioned on page 15.

Snyder was a Girl Scout. An advertisement for three screenings of the Girl Scout film, “The Golden Eaglet”, appeared in the Gazette, December 4, 1919, and said Snyder was one of the scouts appearing in a short exhibition of camp life and first aid work. The March 28, 1920 edition of the Gazette said Snyder, of Troop 4, passed the invalid bed making test. 


The Snyder household and address remained the same in the 1920 census.

The Gazette, June 13, 1921, said Snyder would be one of twenty-nine students graduating the eighth grade of the Western Normal Training school on June 16. Snyder continued her education at Western Normal High School. Apparently, her school operated under the Kalamazoo Plan, a program for teaching art, which was examined in The School Arts Magazine, March 1922.

The 1924 Kalamazoo city directory listed student Snyder and her parents at 121 West Lovell Street.

Snyder graduated in 1925. Next to her senior photograph, in the Highlander yearbook, was this quote, “I love not man less, but art more.”





Snyder may have continued her art training at another institution such as the Kalamazoo School of Art, Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, and Western Michigan University.

The Journal of Proceedings of the Fifty-fourth Annual Convention of the Diocese of Western Michigan (1928) listed receipts for various services. Snyder submitted an invoice of six dollars and twenty-five cents for her signs


Sometime in the late 1920s, Snyder moved to New York City. The 1930 census recorded Snyder as a self-employed artist who had two roommates, Lucile Cameron, a department store saleswoman, and Emma Rayhon, a bank file clerk. The trio lived at 315 West 4th Street in Manhattan.

Snyder’s brother, David, a 1927 graduate, followed her to New York City. David’s marriage to Margaret Lusty was covered in the East Hampton Star (New York), June 9, 1933, which said, “A luncheon and reception was given by Miss Marion [sic] Snyder, sister of the groom, at her home in Greenwich Village immediately after the ceremony.”

King Features Syndicate produced a women’s page with columns about fashion, child-rearing, gossip, beauty advice, etcetera. The page included illustrations and photographs. Snyder produced artwork for at least three of these pages.




Long Island Daily Press, October 6, 1934




Long Island Daily Press, October 13, 1934


Long Island Daily Pres, October 31, 1934

The Field Guide to Wild American Pulp Artists has several of Snyder’s mid-1930s pulp illustrations.

Snyder’s mother passed away February 8, 1936 in Manhattan, New York City. On August 22, 1936 Snyder’s father married Myrtle L Russell in Kalamazoo.

Snyder has not yet been found in the 1940 census. A 1942 Manhattan telephone directory had a listing for an “M L Snyder” at 141 East 45th Street.

Who’s Who of American Comic Books 1928–1999 said Snyder found work at a number of comic book publishers and a comics studio.

Regarding the Binder studio, Women and the Comics (1985) said “Most of these women were inkers and most soon left comics, but two of them, Ann Brewster and Marcia Snyder, were pencillers as well. Both stayed in the industry long after the Binder shop closed in 1943, Brewster going on to spend almost two decades with the Iger-Roche shop...”

At the Sequential Tart site, Murphy Anderson was interviewed by Laurie J. Anderson. He recalled working at the publisher Fiction House, “When I started there they were all ladies, practically. There were only two or three males in there.”

ST: What were the ladies doing? Comic books?
MA: Oh yeah, oh yeah. There was Fran Hopper, she did a number of adventure stories for Planet Comics and all over. Lilly Renée who did their lead feature for Planet Comics. Oh, Ruth McCully was a letterer. Ruth Atkinson was an artist who worked there. Her brother happened to be a very prominent jockey; he was one of the top jockeys in the country at the time. And Marcia Snyder, she did a very heavy adventure-type of material.
Five pages of Snyder’s original art for Ranger Comics (Fiction House) can be viewed at Heritage Auctions.

In Alter Ego #11, November 2001, Jim Amash interviewed Vince Fago who was an artist, writer, and third editor-in-chief of Timely Comics. In 1943, Timely moved from the McGraw-Hill building to the Empire State Building. Amash asked about the move. Fago explained what happened and added, “Later, for $90 a week, I hired Marcia Snyder, an artist who had done newspaper strips. She dressed like a man and lived in Greenwich Village with a girlfriend named Mickey. I never thought about her being a lesbian; I didn’t care….” Amash interviewed artist Dave Gantz who shared a bullpen photograph that included Chris Rule, Barbara Clark Vogel, Gantz, Snyder, Mike Sekowsky and Ed Winiarski. The photograph was taken at the Empire State Building and published in Alter Ego #13, March 2002. Some of Snyder’s comic book credits are at the Grand Comics Database.


Snyder’s father passed away January 13, 1943 in Kalamazoo.

In the 1946 Manhattan telephone directory on page 1150, Snyder was a commercial artist who resided at 64 West 9th Street.

Women and the Comics said Snyder assisted Alfred Andriola on the comic strip, Kerry Drake, which was distributed by Publishers Syndicate. The strip began October 4, 1943. It’s not known when Snyder started assisting Andriola or how long she worked with him.

The East Hampton Star, July 31, 1947, noted Snyder’s visit with her brother in Amagansett, “Miss Marcia Snyder of New York City was entertained last week-end by Mr. and Mrs. David Snyder. Miss Snyder is a commercial artist and works with syndicates in the metropolitan area.” Snyder’s visit to Amagansett was noted in the East Hampton Star, June 2, 1949: “Miss Marcia Snyder of New York, sister of David U. Snyder, with a party of friends, spent the week-end at the Windmill.”

The 1960 Manhattan directory said Snyder still resided at 64 West 9th Street. It’s not known when she moved to Florida.


Snyder passed away in February 1976 according to the Social Security Death Index which said her last residence was Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida. At Ancestry.com, the Florida death index recorded Snyder as “Marsha Louise Snyder”, who was born “May 13, 1914”, and died February 27, 1976 in Dade County.


(Updated January 20, 2018; next post on Monday: Doctor Doletter)

Monday, January 8, 2018

Creator: Cornelia J. Hoff, Illustrator and Designer


Cornelia Josephine Hoff was born on June 22, 1903, in Concord, Massachusetts, according to Massachusetts birth records at Ancestry.com. Her parents were Anton J. Hoff and Pauline Christianson.

In the 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Hoff was the second of four daughters born to the Norwegian emigrant parents. Their father worked at odd jobs. The family resided in Concord on Barretts Mill Road.

The Hoff family had a fifth daughter in the 1920 census. Their address was unchanged.

In 1924 Hoff graduated from the Massachusetts Normal Art School in Boston. The Palette and Pen yearbook had Hoff’s photograph and this description:

Our own “Connie,” lives in North Acton, Mass. She attended Concord High and graduated from there in ’20. “Connie” is a worker, mastering every single subject in its turn. There has never been one turned down or laid aside yet, by “Connie.” She was Secretary of her class as a Freshman, Sophomore and Senior, and has helped on all the Spreads, too. “Connie” will proceed to tell the younger generation just how things are done. Gee, if we could only be students again!

The graduation was covered in the Christian Science Monitor, June 12, 1924. Hoff was one of eighteen women to receive a bachelor of science in education in the teacher-training department. Hoff was one of two students awarded the medal of honor in teacher training.


Hoff was a teacher in Wellesley, Massachusetts. Her name was in the 44th Annual Report of the Town Officers of Wellesley, Massachusetts for the Year Ending December 31, 1924: “9. Cornelia Hoff; Drawing, Crafts; Massachusetts Normal Art School, B.S.; Sept. 1924” Her salary was four-hundred-and-eighty dollars.


So far the earliest record of Hoff’s professional career was a listing in the Eastern Edition of Advertising Arts and Crafts (1927): 

Hoff, Cornelia J., 6 Newbury St., Ken 6175 Boston, Mass. Borders, Decoration, Decorative Wash, Design, Layout, Lettering, Magazine Covers, Ornamentation, Poster, Trade Specialties, Black and White, Charcoal, Color, Line Drawings, Pastel, Pencil, Pen and Ink, Tempra, Wash, Water Color.
Boston city directories, from 1929 to 1937, said Hoff was a commercial artist at 383 Boylston Street in room six. Hoff illustrated several children’s books and mathematics textbooks including The Sunshine School (1928), Walks and Talks in Numberland (1929), and The Alpha Individual Arithmetics series.

The Boston Herald, October 12, 1930, reviewed the young artists exhibition at the Concord Art Centre and said, “…Some remarkable decorations for book pages are by Cornelia Hoff, daughter of one of the American Norwegian families numerous in Concord district, and already employed as illustrator by a leading text-book house.”

In the 1930 and 1940 censuses, Hoff lived with her parents in Carlisle, Massachusetts. In 1930 Hoff’s occupation was illustrator. She was a freelance commercial artist in 1940.

The Lowell Sun, September 21, 1942, reported the reception for the newly-elected pastor of the Carlisle Congregational Church, and said, “…At the end of the receiving line was Miss Irma D. Stanton with the guest book. This book was of original and clever design, the work of a church member, Miss Cornelia Hoff.”

During World War II and the 1950s, Hoff produced designs and illustrations for the Strathmore Paper company. One piece (below) was included in Modern Publicity 23 (1954).




Hoff’s father died September 12, 1948. Her mother’s death was on February 16, 1962. Hoff passed away May 24, 1964. She was laid to rest with her parents at Green Cemetery


(Next post on Monday: Marcia Snyder, Artist)

Monday, January 1, 2018

Monday, December 18, 2017

Herb Lubalin, Air Mail Stamps













Air Mail—15¢

Designer
Herb Lubalin; lettering: John Pistilli; statue drawn by Joseph Lomberdero.

Engravers
Vignette: R.M. Bower; outline frame, lettering, numeral and plane: G.L. Huber.

First Day
Nov. 20, 1959; New York, N.Y.














Air Mail—25¢

Designer
Herb Lubalin; lettering: John Pistilli; illustrations: Joseph Lomberdero.

Engravers
Portrait: M.D. Fenton; outline frame, stars, lettering, numeral and plane: H.F. Sharpless.

First Day
Apr. 22, 1960; San Francisco, Calif.














Air Mail—10¢

Designer
Herb Lubalin; lettering: John Pistilli; illustrations: Joseph Lomberdero.

Engravers
Vignette: A.W. Dintaman; outline frame, lettering and plane: G.L. Huber.

First Day
June 10, 1960; Miami, Fla.














Air Mail—15¢
(Redesigned)

Designer
Herb Lubalin; lettering: John Pistilli; statue drawn by Joseph Lomberdero (modeled by V.S. McCloskey, Jr.)

Engravers
Vignette: A.W. Dintaman; outline frame, lettering, numeral and plane: R.J. Jones.

First Day
Jan. 13, 1961; Buffalo, N.Y.














Air Mail—13¢ 


Designer

Herb Lubalin; lettering: John Pistilli; Modeled by V.S. McCloskey, Jr. and W.K. Schrage.

Engravers

Vignette: A.W. Dintaman; outline frame, lettering, numeral and plane: J.L. Huber.

First Day

June 28, 1961; New York, N.Y.

Source: Postage Stamps of the United States: July 1, 1847 to December 31, 1965 (1966)



Monday, December 11, 2017

Comics: Elmer “Tom” Tomasch, a Timely Artist


Elmer John “Tom” Tomasch was born on November 16, 1914, in Cleveland, Ohio, according to his Social Security application at Ancestry.com. His parents were John Tomasch and Julia Kosman, both Hungarian (1920 census) or Czechoslovakian (1930 census) emigrants.

1920 United States Federal Census
Home: 3477 West 126 Street, West Park, Cuyahoga County, Ohio
Name / Age / Occupation
John Tomasch, 36, “cooper”
Julia Tomasch, 28, none
Elmer Tomasch, 5, none
Helen Tomasch, 7, none
(spelled “Thomash” by census enumerator)

1930 United States Federal Census
Home: 3477 West 126 Street, West Park, Cuyahoga County, Ohio
Name / Age / Occupation
John Tomasch, 44, automobile blacksmith
Julia Tomasch, 38, none
Helen Tomasch, 16, none
Elmer Tomasch, 15, newsboy route
Jack Tomasch, 4, none
Olma Taub, 21, exchange operator

Biographical Dictionary of Kansas Artists (active before 1945) said Tomasch graduated from the Cleveland School of Art and Western Reserve University. He received his master’s degree from Kansas State College. Tomasch was a Cleveland public school teacher.

Cleveland Plain Dealer
(Ohio)
June 4, 1933
May Show at the Cleveland Museum of Art
Class of Illustration.
…Other strong exhibitors are Elmer Tomasch…

Cleveland Plain Dealer
June 2, 1935
May Show at the Cleveland Museum of Art
…Entrants from the teacher training classes were…Elmer J. Tomasch.

Missouri, Marriage Records
Name: Elmer J Tomasch
Spouse: Sadie M Pelkey
Marriage: November 22, 1939, Jackson, Missouri


The Lake Placid News

(New York)
December 8, 1939
Placid Figure Skater Weds Art Teacher
A shower and reception for Mr. and Mrs. Thomas [sic] Tomaseh was given recently by friends at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Pelkey upon the arrival of the bridal couple from Cleveland. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Pelkey and was the former Miss Sadie Pelkey.

Both bride and groom took part at the New York’s World’s Fair. They plan to spend some time here before returning to Cleveland. Mrs. Tomaseh will continue her figure skating and her husband will also take up skating and skiing during his stay here. Among those attending the shower at which the couple received many attractive and useful gifts were: Mr. and Mrs. Frank LaBare, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Pratt, Louis Perry and Richard Charland of Standish, Miss Katharine Pelkey, sister of the bride, and Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Pelkey.
1940 United States Federal Census
Home: 4012 Franklin Boulevard, Cleveland, Ohio
Name / Age / Occupation
Elmer J Tomasch, 25, public school art teacher
Sadie M Tomasch, 20, New York World’s Fair figure skater

Soon after the census enumeration in April, Tomasch moved to Lake Placid, New York, where Tomasch’s first son, Lyndon, was born on June 10, 1940. Also born in Lake Placid was Kim on July 14, 1947. Tomasch had a third son, Bret. The Biographical Dictionary of Kansas Artists said Tomasch taught at Lake Placid.

An obituary for Sadie said:

As a young woman, Mrs. Tomasch was a professional ice skater and skated with the Ice Capades. While skating at the 1939 World’s Fair, held in New York City, she met and later married Elmer J. Tomasch, a caricature artist also working at the World’s Fair….The Tomasch’s lived in New York City for several years before moving to Manhattan [Kansas] in 1947….
The Lake Placid News
July 12, 1940
Three Lake Placid students are enrolled in the summer school at Syracuse University, Miss Stella McKeown, Charles F. Lehman, Jr., and Elmer J. Tomasch.
The Lake Placid News
August 16, 1940
Among the house guests this week at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Pelkey are: Mrs. John Tomasch and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Becker, all of Cleveland, O. They are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Tomasch who live at the Pelkey home.
The Lake Placid News
June 27, 1941
Mr. and Mrs. E.J. Tomasch left Monday for New York City where Mr. Tomasch will remain to attend summer school. Mrs. Tomasch will return later in the week.
The Lake Placid News
March 13, 1942
Junior Class Presents Play Tonight, ‘The Late Christopher’
…The set and stage background were designed by James Mulvey and the art director Elmer Tomasch….
The Lake Placid News
September 11, 1942
Miss Kate Pelkey returned Tuesday after spending a week at the home of her sister, Mrs. E.J. Tomasch in Astoria, L.I. [New York City’s Queens Borough] Returning with her was Mrs. Tomasch’s infant son, Lyndon, who will spend some time at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Pelkey.
Timely-Atlas-Comics
an excerpt from “Allen Bellman: The Interview”
Michael J. Vassallo: Who were some of your biggest artistic influences at Timely?
Allen Bellman: At Timely there was a guy named Tom Tomasch. He taught me a lot when I arrived. He was a short guy, very sophisticated and very nice. A real classy person. He even wrote a book on anatomy. [The ABC’s of Anatomy (1947)] He knew anatomy so well. He originally lived up in Lake Placid. His real name was, I think Elmer Tomasch but he was known as Tom. He would look over my work and correct me early on. Syd Shores was also a great help.

M: Was Tom Tomasch an artist or production person?
B: Tom was an artist and a darned good one at that. He knew his anatomy extremely well. He would make suggestions to me that helped me in my drawing.
The interview has Tomasch’s illustration for “Make Up Your Mind!” which was published in Miss America, Volume 1, Number 4, January 1945. Tomasch also illustrated “It’s Fun to Act” which was in the second issue of Miss America.

In Alter Ego #11, November 2001, Jim Amash interviewed Vince Fago, artist, writer and third editor-in-chief of Timely Comics. Amash asked, “Who else sticks out in your mind from Timely?” After naming several artists, Fago said, “There was a man named Thomas who did a lot of the Human Torch stories; he later became a teacher. I don’t remember anything else about him except he was German.” Fago described Tomasch whose name sounded like Thomas.

Alter Ego #33, February 2004, published “Viva Valerie! An Interview with ‘Glamorous Girl Inker’ Valerie (a.k.a.) Violet) Barclay”. The interview was conducted by Jim Amash who asked, “What do you remember about Syd Shores?” Barclay answered
“He was a very talented artist who did Captain America. He had another artist who worked with him who was a short, blond, Irish or English type of guy. I can’t think of his name now, but he used to take Syd Shores’ work and ink it. He had a tremendous knowledge of anatomy and would sharpen up muscles. Syd would pencil very roughly, and this man was a strong inker who’d tighten it all up.”
[Note: Vince Alascia isn’t the man Valerie Barclay was trying to recall. Anybody know who it might be?—Jim.]
I believe Barclay described Tomasch.

Biographical Dictionary of Kansas Artists said Tomasch joined the faculty at Kansas State University, Manhattan in 1947. Tomasch’s work was exhibited in Prairie Water Color Painters, Derby, England, 1948, and Kansas State University, 1978.

The Lake Placid News

April 30, 1948
Infant Death
Word has been received here of the death of the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer J. Tomasch of Manhattan, Kansas, and granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson of Lake Placid and Mr. and Mrs. John Tomasch of Cleveland, Ohio. Also a niece of Mrs. C.J. Martin, lake Placid, and Helen Becker of Cleveland. Burial was in the Catholic cemetery in Manhattan.
The Lake Placid News
July 27, 1951
Tomasch Home Ruined in Flood
Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Pelkey gave received word by radiogram and letter from their daughter, Mrs. Elmer Tomasch, telling of her family’s safety after being caught in the flood at Manhattan, Kan. It was the first news received from the family in three weeks. The flood ruined their home where seven feet of water still remained and the family was taken for refuge to the Kansas State College where Mr. Tomasch is professor of art.
Kansas State Collegian
November 14, 1951
page 8: Kansas Magazine Features Articles, Art by K-Staters

Kansas State Collegian
November 19, 1951
page 7: Ability to Sleep on the Job Pays Off for Models in Tomasch’s Art Classes

Kansas State Collegian
December 13, 1951
page 15: Catalogs, Bulletins Win First Prizes

Kansas State Collegian
February 4, 1952
page 3: Tomasch Is Brain Behind Artistry of Publications

The Lake Placid News
August 15, 1952
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Tomasch and children of Manhattan, Kan., are visiting Mrs. Tomasch’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Pelkey. Mrs. Tomasch and children will remain here during the winter while Mr. Tomasch studies for a master’s degree at New York University. During the week they made a brief trip to Cleveland to visit the mother of Mr. Tomasch, accompanying Mr. and Mrs. Robert Pfieffer of Manhattan, who drove east with them last Friday.
1952 Royal Purple
Kansas State College, Manhattan, Kansas
Tomasch contributed over 20 cartoons
page 140: “E.J. Tomasch, whose sketches appear throughout the book, handled all cartoon artwork in the 1952 Royal Purple and gave invaluable assistance in working out page layouts for the book.”




































1954 Royal Purple
Kansas State College, Manhattan, Kansas


















1955 Royal Purple
Kansas State College, Manhattan, Kansas



























Kansas State Collegian
May 9, 1957
page 1: German Arts to Highlight Weekend Festival Program
...Saturday’s schedule includes a gallery lecture at 2:30 p.m. on drawings and graphic arts being exhibited in the art lounge by E.J. Tomasch, assistant professor in the Architecture and Allied Arts department.
Kansas State Collegian
November 6, 1957
page 3: SU Displays Kansas Art
The Kansas Federation of Art is sponsoring a display of 16 paintings in the Union lounge. The paintings will remain there until November 10.

...Six of the paintings are by members of the K-State faculty.
The faculty members are Oscar V. Larmer, assistant professor of art; E.J. Tomasch, assistant professor of architecture; …
Kansas State College Bulletin
Volume 42, Number 11, 1958
Kansas Engineering Experiment Station
Bulletin 87, 1958
Creative Drawing
E. J. Tomasch

Kansas State Collegian
October 28, 1958
page 3: SU Kansas Mag Ready Soon for Stands
Kansas Magazine will soon make its yearly appearance on the newsstands. It contains 104 pages of literature and art produced mainly by Kansans and former Kansans. All of the works are appearing in ring for the first times.…Of the eight contributors of art, one is a K-State staff member—E.J. Tomasch of the Art Department.
Kansas State Collegian
November 20, 1958
page 1: SU Contemporary Italian Music Discussed by Prof Stratton
,,,E.J. Tomasch will give a demonstration of portraiture in the art lounge at 3:15 p.m….
1959 Royal Purple
Kansas State College, Manhattan, Kansas



















Kansas State Collegian
February 4, 1959
page 1: Art Not Appreciated, Claims Professor
…When he came here in 1947, this was his first college position. He had previously worked in New York City for the Martin-Goodman [sic] Publications….
The Salina Journal
(Kansas)
November 19, 1965
Sandzen Gallery Plans Reception 
Lindsborg—The Sandzen Memorial gallery at Bethany college will ”…also have a new show Sunday, a one-man show by E. J. Tomasch, Kansas State university. Prof. Tomasch is recognized for his work in figures and painting….”

The Manhattan Mercury
(Kansas)
February 23, 1966
K-State Art Professor Shows Negro Paintings
Paintings of the life of Negroes is being featured in a one-man show by Elmer J. Tomasch at The Barn Gallery, 8200 Mission Road, Prairie Village, that began Sunday through March 13. Tomasch, an associate professor of art at Kansas State University, is a pioneer in the emerging period of great art of today’s America.

Explains Tomasch: “The changing status of the Negro and his role in today’s society is one of our nation’s most pressing and challenging problems. Our newspapers, radios, and television networks keep us well informed with daily reports on the latest developments in civil rights. We are permitted to see Uie Negro in his marches, as he is engaged in sit-ins, as he boycotts stores and even as he riots.

“Yet there is another side to the Negro we barely know. The side which shows him as a man devoted to his family and as one who is capable of experiencing all emotions. It is this side of the life of Negroes I depict in the series of paintings currently being displayed.”

Tomasch studied at the Cleveland School of Art. He has exhibited at the Gallery Anjoy, New York City; The Ankrum Gallery and the Paul Rival Gallery in Los Angeles; and the Cleveland Museum of Art. He has had one-man shows in Manhattan, Lindsborg and Wichita. 
The Yellow Brick Road Trip
Johnny Kaw Statute – Manhattan, KS
“In 1966, Kaw was memorialized in a 30-foot, statue that cost $7,000 to build. He was designed by Elmer Tomasch, a member of the Kansas State University’s Art Department.”

Tomasch wrote A Foundation for Expressive Drawing which was published in 1969.

The Wichita Eagle (Kansas), October 19, 1969, reported the exhibition at the Birger Sandzen Memorial Art Gallery on the campus of Bethany College at Lindsborg, Kansas. The show included a painting or paintings by Tomasch.


The Manhattan Mercury

May 21, 1974
Earns Award
Bret Tomasch, son of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Tomasch, 809 Juniper Dr., was presented the John Philip Sousa Band award at Manhattan High School recently. A flutist, Tomasch has been selected for both the band and orchestra the past three years by the Kansas Music Education Association. He is also the holder of six gold medals in state music competition.
Tomasch passed away May 12, 1977 according to the Manhattan Mercury.
Well-known KSU artist Elmer Tomasch is dead
Popular and prolific artist Elmer Tomasch, a member of the Kansas State University faculty for 30 years, died this morning at age 62 in Memorial Hospital. Death was attributed to natural causes. Final rites for one of the most versatile K-State Art Department members where he held the rank of associate professor will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday at Seven Dolors Roman Catholic Church with Fr. Carl Kramer as celebrant. Interment will be in Sunrise Cemetery. The Rosary will be recited for Mr. Tomasch at 7.30 p.m. Friday at the Parkview Funeral Home. Friends wishing to contribute to a memorial 'and for an art scholarship in Mr. Tomasch's name may leave donations at the funeral home.

Mr. Tomasch is survived by his widow Sadie, of the home on Route 5; three sons, Kim and Bret of the home, and Lyndon of Olathe; one sister, Mrs. Helen Becker of Charlotte, N.C.; and two grandchildren.

The artist whose works besides his paintings included numerous illustrations, caricatures and designs for such things as the Johnny Kaw statue in City Park had been a KSU artist member of the K-State art faculty since 1947. He gained reputation as an artist concerned with the use of the human figure. Man, through his eyes, was both idea and form, and he put his thoughts into his teaching and into [missing text]

(Next post on Monday: Herb Lubalin, Air Mail Stamps)